ALA Report on Libraries and Reentry

The American Library Association has published a report on how libraries support people who have been incarcerated after they are released from jails and prisons. The report features library services provided across the United States. It highlights innovative and needed programs that provide models for library systems considering how they can better support people impacted by policing and incarceration. From the press release:

“For incarcerated persons, books are windows into different worlds. For those formerly incarcerated, libraries are doors of opportunity,” said ALA Senior Director of Public Policy and Government Relations Alan Inouye. “Libraries not only provide books and internet connected devices, they offer staff to help reentering patrons use the technology and navigate the network of resources and information to help them get their bearing in a world vastly different than the one they came from.”

The full press release is available here.

For the full report, please see

Video: Alcatraz and Mass Incarceration

San Francisco Public Library hosted a conversation between Troy Williams and Jackson Lam on July 22, 2020.  The video below is  recording of that event.  In this video, Troy shares his own experiences of  incarceration and reentry and emphasizes the value of restorative justice in his life.

 

“Troy Williams, founder and director of Restorative Media and host of the Troy Williams Journal served 25 years in prison facilities. Williams along with a National Park Service Alcatraz park ranger will discuss mass incarceration in America. Learn how the history of incarceration at Alcatraz informs us about the state of incarceration today, with a special focus on incarceration and reentry during the current pandemic, protests and uprisings.”  (Description from San Francisco Public Library.)

Timeline of Library Services to Incarcerated People

Note: Please see the revised timeline in my chapter on Carceral Histories in the United States.

Timeline image

I’ve created a timeline of library services to incarcerated people beginning with the first library committee on the topic that I could locate (1911) through the creation of ALA’s most recent version of the standards for service to correctional institutions (1992).  You can access the work in progress at

Library Services to Incarcerated People_ 1911-1992